One of the reasons you can trust us is that when we make a mistake (and we will make mistakes), we will correct the error within the article, also noting the mistake on the article’s webpage and adding it to a running list of EdNC corrections. If you find an error, email info@ednc.org.

In a post on March 5, 2015, Lot’s going on: Demographics, the budget, and dropout and discipline reports, this paragraph was added:

The shift is due in part to fertility rates. He said that the rate needs to be about 2.1  births per woman for a a racial or ethnic group to replace itself. Hispanics (2.99) and blacks (2.13) are the only groups achieving that. Asians are coming close at 2.04.

In a post on March 10, 2015, Top five myths of the public school budget, the figure in paragraph one was changed to $8.7 billion and clarified to be FY 2014-15. In myth #3, figures changed and clarified to reflect FY 2013-14.

In a post on March 18, 2015, Student health assessments could expand, an update and correction was issued by the author.

The post, The children are the future in rural counties, posted briefly on Monday, March 23, 2015, with a version of the video that contained two images of schools in Beaufort instead of Beaufort County.

In a post on July 28, 2015, Building literacy: One reader and writer at a time, this statistic was corrected: 54.3 percent of third through eighth grade students in the state are reading below grade level.

In a post, The real war on education in North Carolina, this paragraph was corrected on August 17, 2015:

Original:

  • Relatively few North Carolina teachers are leaving to teach in other states, and fewer are leaving now than before the economic recession. The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s 2014 Teacher Turnover Report reports that only 455 left for this reason in 2014—just three percent of the 13,616 teachers who left their jobs last year. The percentage of teachers “fleeing” to other states was actually higher before the recession, as 3.5 percent of teachers in 2008 left to teach in other states.

Correction:

  • Relatively few North Carolina teachers are leaving to teach in other states, and rates have been relatively consistent since the economic recession. The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s 2014 Teacher Turnover Report reports that the percentage of teachers leaving for other states rose slightly in 2014 (734, or 5.4 percent) with fewer leaving (341, or 3.5 percent) in 2012, consistent with the rate in 2008 (467, or 3.5 percent).

In a post on December 9, 2015, December’s Charter School Advisory Board Meeting, board member Steven Walker was identified as Scott Walker.

In a post on July 13, 2016, The 2016 Legislative Session: What’s hot and what’s not in ed policy, the following paragraph was corrected.

Original:

  • In the compromise budget, the state will spend an extra $5.8 million to increase the special education opportunity scholarship program by 137 percent. And, the budget for the regular opportunity scholarship program will go up by $10 million each year for 10 years, increasing funding from about $35 million appropriated in 2016-17, to almost $135 million in 2026-27.

Correction: 

  • In the compromise budget, the state will spend an extra $5.8 million to increase the special education opportunity scholarship program by 137 percent. And, the budget for the regular opportunity scholarship program will go up by $10 million each year for 11 years, increasing funding from about $35 million appropriated in 2016-17, to almost $145 million in 2027-28 and each year after.

In a post on October 17, 2016, Princeville students without homes or a school, Tarboro High School was identified as North Edgecombe High School.

In a post on December 15, 2016, Rhonda King was identified as living in Princeville. She lives in Nashville. The title, the article, and the video were corrected.

In a post on January 26, 2017, “Franklin County offers bonuses to fill EC vacancies,” the name of the nearby seminary school was misstated. The school is called Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

In a post on February, 15, 2017, the following sentence was corrected:

Original:

Correction:

In a post on July 6, 2017, a chart describing a pilot program was incorrectly placed under calendar flexibility instead of class size flexibility. The chart was removed and the following text was corrected: 

Original:

  • While that bill did not make it through the General Assembly, aspects of it were added to the final budget. The budget’s pilot program would allow schools to participate in the following counties: (CHART). It was the only school calendar flexibility provision to pass this session. 

Correction: 

  • None of the calendar flexibility measures passed this session.

In a post on August 4, 2017, State Board discusses literacy deficiencies, ESSA state plan, a quote by Wayne McDevitt was misattributed. It was corrected and attributed to McDevitt. 

In a post on October 5, 2017, General Assembly, State Board tackle principal pay, the following was corrected:

Original:
  • The State Board voted to send the letter Thursday after getting a report from its legislative director, Cecilia Holden, that about 350 principals could lose pay during the 2018-19 school year after the hold harmless expires.
Correction:
  • The State Board voted to send the letter Thursday after getting a report from its legislative director, Cecilia Holden, that about 350 principals are currently being held harmless this fiscal year. 
 

In a post on October 25, 2017, Newton debate on possibility of merit-based teacher pay focuses on the ‘how’, the following was corrected:

Original:
  • Nordstrom mentioned programs in six different districts across the state piloting differentiated pay.
Correction: 
  • Nordstorm mentioned the differentiated pay used statewide to reward reading and math teachers for students’ growth in certain grades, as well as career and technical education (CTE) and advanced placement (AP) teachers. 

In a post on November 2, 2017Education funding study gets underway, the following was corrected:

Original: 
  • The distribution of funds changes depending on the type of student. A typical student with no special needs affords the school $100. But a student who is in 2nd grade may get an extra 1 percent of that $100, or $10 because the student is in the K-3 category. If the student has a disability, the school receives an extra 6 percent of that $100 base, or an additional $60 dollars. When all the numbers are added up on that student, the school gets a total of $170 for that one student.

Correction: 
  • The distribution of funds changes depending on the type of student. A typical student with no special needs affords the school $100. But a student who is in 2nd grade may get an extra 10 percent of that $100, or $10 because the student is in the K-3 category. If the student has a disability, the school receives an extra 60 percent of that $100 base, or an additional $60 dollars. When all the numbers are added up on that student, the school gets a total of $170 for that one student.

Original:  A film posted on January 18, 2018 included language indicating a link between third grade test failures and prison construction projections.

Correction: The film was revised to remove the inaccuracy.
 
In a post on March 6, 2018, Understanding the state’s education commissions, the date of a commission meeting was corrected. 
 
Original:
Its next meeting is this week in Asheville.
Correction: 
Its next meeting is in Wilmington in May. 
The headline of a post on March 7, 2018, was corrected from “Tech experts cautions state schools unprepared for cybersecurity events” to “Tech expert cautions state schools unprepared for cybersecurity events.” 
 
In a post on March 30, 2018, “Diversity and STEM Education in eastern North Carolina.” the word “except” was corrected to “accept.”
 
Original: To be a destination for educators of color, we must engage in practices that will welcome their experience and accept their diversity with the understanding they may reach students of similar backgrounds. 
 
Corrected: To be a destination for educators of color, we must engage in practices that will welcome their experience and accept their diversity with the understanding they may reach students of similar backgrounds. 
 
In a post on April 4, 2018, “State Board explores reasons for chronic absenteeism of teachers,” the word “State” was omitted. It has been corrected.
 
Original: Delving into the statistics for the past three school years, Timothy Drake, an assistant professor of Education Leadership and Policy at North Carolina University’s College of Education, said that North Carolina’s stock of chronically absent teachers hovers around 22 percent.
 
Corrected: Delving into the statistics for the past three school years, Timothy Drake, an assistant professor of Education Leadership and Policy at North Carolina State University’s College of Education, said that North Carolina’s stock of chronically absent teachers hovers around 22 percent.
 
A post on April 30, 2018, NEA rankings are in: Where North Carolina falls on teacher pay and per-pupil spending, incorrectly stated that North Carolina’s average teacher salary has increased five percent since 2009, but accounting for inflation, it has decreased four percent. It has decreased nine percent when adjusted for inflation.
 
Original: North Carolina’s average teacher salary has increased five percent since 2009, but accounting for inflation, it has decreased four percent.
 
Corrected: . North Carolina’s average teacher salary has increased five percent since 2009, but accounting for inflation, it has decreased nine percent.
 
In a post on May 8, 2018, Superintendent Johnson allocates funds for literacy training and coaching, the cost of HillRAP training was incorrect.
 
Original: Darah Whyte, communications director at The Hill Center, said the full training costs $500 for a district, but most districts do not pay the full price because of scholarships, training a smaller cohort first, or only wanting online services.
 
Corrected: Darah Whyte, communications director at The Hill Center, said fully certifying a teacher normally costs $3,000 and initial training costs $750. 
 
A post on May 8, 2018, Beverly Owens wants to make a difference in the classroom, incorrectly reported that Owens spent 10 years at Discovery Place in Charlotte. She worked in that role for two years. 
 
Original: She worked in that role for 10 years before feeling the call to return to middle school.
 
Corrected: She worked in that role for 2 years before feeling the call to return to middle school.
 
A post on June 7, 2018, Ed roundup: State Board of Education and General Assembly, incorrectly provided a list of charter schools approved by the State Board of Education. The State Board of Education isn’t voting until July 2018 on the charter schools to open in fall 2018, and one of the schools, Anson Academy Charter, asked for a one-year delay. 
 
A post on November 6, 2018, Wayne County Schools push back against attempted ISD takeover, originally stated that Charlotte-based Achievement for All Children is a for-profit charter management organization. That is incorrect. Achievement for All Children is a non-profit.
 
A post on December 11, 2018, Residency for community colleges: A look at barriers for North Carolinians seeking a better life, incorrectly stated 40 percent of applicants dropped off the RDS during questioning about their parents. That is incorrect. It is 40 percent of the applicants who dropped off of the RDS did so during questioning about their parents.
 
Original: 40 percent of applicants dropped off the RDS during questioning about their parents.
 
Corrected: 40 percent of the applicants who dropped off of the RDS did so during questioning about their parents.
 
A post on January 15, 2018, Fidelity workshop trains educators in computer science, incorrectly referred to Dave Fry as Davie Fry and incorrectly referred to the Friday Institute for Educational Innovation as the Friday Center for Educational Innovation.
 
A post on January 31, 2019, Charter schools in North Carolina: An overview, incorrectly stated that the 2013 CREDO study used charter school lottery results instead of using a virtual control record (VCR) approach that creates a “virtual twin” for charter students.
 
A post on February 1, 2019, Who’s making state-level education decisions?, incorrectly stated that there were nine gubernatorial appointees to the State Board of Community Colleges instead of ten. The post also incorrectly referred to the board’s student representative as Roderick Gooden, whose term expired. The board’s current student representative is Toni Formato. 
 
A post on February 1, 2019, Who’s making state-level education decisions?, incorrectly stated the number of charter schools in North Carolina. There are 184 instead of 183. The post also incorrectly stated the composition of the Charter Schools Advisory Board. Four members are appointed by the House, four by the Senate, two by the State Board, and one by the lieutenant governor. The governor no longer has appointees on the board.
 
A post on February 5, 2019, An opening salvo in calendar flexibility originally stated incorrectly that a requirement about the number of days and hours students had to be in school was adopted in 2003 for the first time. That requirement is a long-standing one in North Carolina. 
 
A post on February 18, 2019, What to expect in North Carolina Education this week originally stated that the Senate education/higher education committee that week would be taking up Senate Bill 38 Wednesday at 11. The committee will meet but will not be taking up any bills. 
 
A post on February 28, 2019, DHHS releases statewide early childhood goals, misspelled the last name of the keynote speaker at the event as Shocknoff. His last name is Shonkoff.
 
A post on March 19, 2019, Preparing North Carolina’s teachers, misspelled the last name of the assistant dean for school and community partnerships at UNC Charlotte’s College of Education as Green in one instance. Her last name is Greene.
 
A post on March 20, On the front lines at Highland Elementary School, incorrectly stated that Highland Elementary School is in Sanford. The school is in Burlington.
 
A post on April 10, Chicago Knights Robotics team takes on regional robotics competition,
incorrectly referred to the X-Carve machine (pictured) as a 3D printer. It is a CNC machine. A photo was also previously credited to Josh Moore. The photo is courtesy of John Moore. 
 
A post on April 23, State of Sciences event brings creativity in focus, incorrectly referred to the author of the Eiduson study as Samuel Eiduson. The study author was Bernice Eiduson (his wife).
 
A post on April 30, Reaching all learners: Why I’m spending a week in New Zealand, incorrectly referred to the Teach for All-Oak Foundation Reaching All Learners fellowship as being a year long. It is a yearly, six-month fellowship.
 
A post on May 7, 2019, Early childhood leaders convene in Greensboro to address access and quality across state and nation, incorrectly stated that the House’s budget proposal does not include funding for additional NC Pre-K slots. The proposal does include funding for additional NC Pre-K slots, allocated in last year’s legislative session.
 
Original:

 The House budget does not include funding for more NC Pre-K slots but does allocate an increase in the reimbursement rate centers are paid for providing NC Pre-K slots.
Corrected:

The House budget includes funding from last year’s legislative session for an additional 1,700 NC Pre-K slots in 2019-20 and another 1,700 slots in 2020-21. The proposal also allocates an increase in the reimbursement rate centers are paid for providing NC Pre-K slots.